F/Lt Preihs
describes how he obtained two 'hacks' for the unit:
    It was after the ceasefire and we were stationed at Risano. Our OC, S/Ldr Berezecki asked me to fly him to Bologna for a briefing at the HQ. We took our unit’s Fairchild (light plane). After landing I taxied to the nearby hangar where the staff car was waiting for Wolodia (Berezecki). The was supposed to be a short one and I decide to stay by the plane, look over the refueling and read a book. Soon two American GI came with in a browser and filled up the Fairchild’s tank. They were very friendly. It looked like except us, the airfield absolutely deserted. Two Americans approached me and asked whether I have a spare bottle of Whisky with me. Surprised I posed a stupid question: What do you need it for? I learned that they were left there alone to refuel aircraft if in need. Day the before, some unit brought two German planes and left in another hangar. Nobody have any orders as what to do with them, my two newly acquainted friends wanted to swap these planes for whisky. They led to the place where to my surprise, I saw a Messerschnidt 109 standing in a corner, and quickly acclaim that. –Yes sir! That’s what it is! Two GIs approved of mine enthusiasm. I approach it for a closer look and again I was surprised, for the fighter looked like spanking new. Even the paint looked fresh. The other plane was a rather worn-off Bucker-Youngman light plane…
    … I decided to make a deal with Americans and went to see Wolodia. The moment the briefing was over, I took him aside and outlined my plans. After some persuasive talk he agreed to help me out. Once that was decided he acted quickly. We went to a radio room and Wolodia called Risano and talked to F/Lt Gadomski who was in charge. He asked him to find a volunteer for flying a Messerschmidt from Bologna to out unit. Right after this, he went somewhere and quite remarkably, produced a two bottles of Bourbon…
    …Before long I flew back to Risano, and during the flight we discussed details of this unusual transaction. From a small group of pilots available, P/O Stramik was the one to ferry in our trophy…
    …At Bologna we didn’t waste any time. We paid off the Americans and with their help, started to roll the planes out. Stramik was full of doubts whether he would be able to take off in the Messerschmidt, but they soon vanished as we found a flight manual in its cockpit. It was in German and it took us some time before we figured out whats and wheres
    …The day was ending and we had get going. We refueled out three planes and were ready to fly: Stramik in the Messerschmidt, me in the Bucker and Wolodia in our Fairchild. To our joy, the Messer’s engine started immediately, and with clouds of dark smoke bellowing from its exhaust stacks. We were full of praise for Stramik to see him speeding down the runway and taking off with ease. He immediately started to climb trailing impressive amount of smoke. According to Wolodia, the reason for this smoke was 100-octane fuel we used, instead German synthetic one. We sincerely hoped that Stramik would make it to Risano.
    My Bucker behaved normally and in the flight Wolodia kept close to me. As we approached Risano, I noticed a great deal of commotion on a main runway. There was quite a crowd down there, together with our Messerschmidt, ambulances, fire truck and other vehicles. We had to land on a grass strip, and soon joined the crowd. The first we met was F/Lt Gadomski. He described to us Stramik’s landing and absolute astonishments of the airfield’s crew. Luckily for him, AA defenses were already withdrawn. Even before Stramik ended his taxiing, our Wing’s staff car cut him off and whole bunch officers jumped out. To their farther surprise, the emerging pilot appeared to be a young Polish officer. After a short moment of consternation, they consulted the King’s Regulations, and having not to found appropriate one to the situation, they congratulated Stramik his flight. (WR. free translation)